Midas: Fiction and Fact

The so-called Tomb of Midas in Gordium

King Midas of Phrygia is best known from Greek legend: the story about the drunken Silenus, the story about “the Midas touch”, the story about the donkey ears, and several others, including a nice parallel to the Roman story about the Lacus Curtius.

Yet, the Greeks also remembered him as a real king, the first to send presents to Delphi. This Midas had fought against the Cimmerians, had been defeated, and had committed suicide. He is almost certainly identical to the Mit-ta-a of Muški mentioned in the Annals of the Assyrian king Sargon II.

I’ve made a new page, which you can find here.

One Response to Midas: Fiction and Fact

  1. bessfones says:

    What was so surprising after learning that Midas was a historical, not mythological figure was the enormous girth of the trees used in the construction of the tomb. Turkish friends blamed the deforestation of modern Turkey on the Roman’s insatiable need for wood to stoke the fires for their baths.

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