Plutarch, On the Control of Anger

Plutarch, bust from the museum of Delphi.

Few additions to LacusCurtius‘ steadily growing collection of translations of Plutarch‘s Moralia were better timed than yesterday’s On the Control of Anger. I was really upset, even angry, by the way the Dutch government had announced plans to get out of the economic crisis, and I was surprised at my own anger. Dutch political life never really influences my mood but yesterday, it did. When I was on my way to the place where I had to lecture, I had a feeling that it was sort of obscene to tell the students something about Herodotus now that obviously a time had come to carry daggers under myrtle-branches. Of course, when I entered the classroom and saw my students, those pathetic thoughts vanished into thin air, and when I returned home, I found Plutarch’s essay, which was remarkably suited to the occasion.

The English translation, as I said, is here; and the Greek text, with a French translation, is here. I would like to add that you will like it even when you live in a country where the politicians are still in touch with the people. But I had decided to control my anger, so I just say that you will like it and I will not say the rest.

3 Responses to Plutarch, On the Control of Anger

  1. Bill Thayer says:

    Goodness clue me in, Jona: you know some country out there where politicians are in touch with the people!

    For me too the essay was good to read, but my own problem is rather more chronic than acute.

  2. rpearse says:

    Well, I think we can take it that the Roman Caesar of our days, Silvius Berlusconius, is definitely in touch with the people, or at least that section which is young and female and for hire. His wife has the photographs to prove it…

    No signs of a Brutus to cut him, er, off in his prime, tho.

  3. ibhahn says:

    Jona, I hadn’t followed your blog recently but got back to it today via Twitter and “Roman News and Archeology.”

    I’m glad, the Plutarch above is a timely reminder in today’s political environment! I also enjoyed the fallacies pieces.

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