Question

Messianic symbols: the star of David on the rebuilt Temple

I am currently writing about the rise of eschatological speculation in the second century BCE. Many texts, especially the Dead Sea Scrolls, are quite allusive: you need to know what the Branch, the Shoot, the Star and so on mean to understand what the text is about. It’s one big intertextual web.

But why?

I do not think it was necessary to write in code. At first, I thought it was a bit of a toy for the writing elite, which is not without parallel in ancient literate societies. The Epic of Gilgamesh already contains puns and word plays. But another thought crossed my mind: you can see a similar, highly allusive, kind of poetry at the same time in Alexandria.

If Greek concepts like the soul can find their way to sectarian Jewish religious texts, and if even an anti-Hellenistic text like Maccabees dates events to the Seleucid era, is it possible that a Callimachus influenced Jewish writers?

On a related note: is it too far-fetched to draw a parallel between the use of a dead type of Greek in the Second Sophistic and the use of Hebrew in the Mishna? (Personally, I think this is far-fetched, but perhaps someone knows more.)

Your input is welcome.

About these ads

One Response to Question

  1. E A M Harris says:

    IMHO speculation about the past is fun and sometimes shows a new path to investigate.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 335 other followers

%d bloggers like this: